An Explosive Story from Under the Sea

For hundreds of years, I have been swimming under the surface of the water, earning my name; Kolumbo. I have the ability to create land and life, but I can also take these away. My constant enemy, the ocean, tries to suppress me, believing the false pretense that I am only capable of death and destruction. But I have been here, giving and taking, just … Continue reading An Explosive Story from Under the Sea

A Beautiful Place with a Frightening Reality

After living in California on the San Andreas fault, I never realized how many people did not know how dangerous it was and all of the misconceptions people had about the fault. Before I started taking geology classes, I was definitely one of those people. I knew that it was there, but I really did not know much about it. I didn’t know the risks … Continue reading A Beautiful Place with a Frightening Reality

Cape Plaka: A Trail Through History

The day was June 06, 2018. My day began atop a landscape overlooking the Aegean Sea. The heat was blistering and the air was humid, but I will not forget what I saw this day. To the front of me is the Aegean Sea, but positioned to my right is the explosive history of Santorini. I examined the wall, taking in each gradational layer piled … Continue reading Cape Plaka: A Trail Through History

A Glimpse of the Past

Humans have learned to use rocks for many different purposes in life, such as for tools, jewelry, and even counter tops, but what intrigues me is the observation and inference of rocks that tell a story of the past. Even after taking multiple geology classes at NAU, I have only recently learned about one important characteristic of volcanic deposits that provides information on how an eruption occurred thousands of years ago; a block sag.  The geologic definition of a “block” is defined as an angular piece of lava (larger than 64mm) that was ballistically ejected from a volcanic vent. On the other hand, a block sag is a depressed or indented section of rock strata that was created by a ballistically ejected angular fragment of a volcano during an explosive eruption. The blocks that we’ve seen here on Santorini have had a wide variety of sizes, ranging up to two meters. We found an impressive two meter block on the edge of Cape Akrotiri, which is on the southwest tip of the island. (Observation Point 9 on the map below)

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