An Explosive Story from Under the Sea

For hundreds of years, I have been swimming under the surface of the water, earning my name; Kolumbo. I have the ability to create land and life, but I can also take these away. My constant enemy, the ocean, tries to suppress me, believing the false pretense that I am only capable of death and destruction. But I have been here, giving and taking, just … Continue reading An Explosive Story from Under the Sea

You need land before it can flood.

Santorini, like anywhere else in the world is prone to experiencing natural hazards. On this study abroad trip my project is to explore the hazard of flooding. Throughout the coarse I will be focusing on what landscapes are needed to facilitate flooding, what places have flooded in the past, and which areas will be prone to flooding in the future. Flooding is dependent on the … Continue reading You need land before it can flood.

How Santorini Came to Be

Hi everyone! My name is Petra and I will be leading you on a tour of Santorini, an island in the Aegean Sea with an explosive past. I’ve included a photo of myself above so you will recognize me as we go exploring. Let’s begin by looking at the different types of volcanoes! The photo above shows the six different types of volcanoes that can … Continue reading How Santorini Came to Be

Explosive Tourism

Tickets! Tickets please!
Oh, hello there! Are you here for the geology tour of Santorini? I’ll be taking a group on a tour around the island to the see the active volcanic dome, the Akrotiri Archaeological site, different beaches created by volcanic events, and much more! It all starts here at Fira port and all you need is a tick-Ah! I see you’ve already got one. Perfect! Climb aboard my boat, the Gem of the Sea, and let the adventure begin! Continue reading “Explosive Tourism”

A Simple and Easy Math Problem

On June 13th we returned to the Cape Akrotiri lighthouse where we first looked at the domes that formed the Akrotiri peninsula. This time, Lisa wanted to show us the most massive block she’s ever seen. A block is a solidified rock that is thrown up into the air during an eruption, and can be any shape. This blocks shape was gigantic. 

We walked down the slope behind the Akrotiri lighthouse. Lisa pointed out the thin layer of pumice from Phase 1 of the eruption which consisted of pumice fall. On top of Phase 1 was the white lapilli and ash beds of Phase 2 that were deposited as a result of pyroclastic surges. Pyroclastic surges are turbulent clouds of ash and lapilli and lithic fragments that tumble across the landscape outward from the vent depositing the material according to density. Lithic fragments are usually deposited together in a pyroclastic surge because of their density. The giant block Lisa brought us down there to see was obviously too large to be carried by a pyroclastic surge. It wasn’t even close to the size of the lithic fragments carried by the surge. So how did it get there? 

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How it’s Made: The Formation of Santorini

As we arrived in Santorini, I wondered how this island was created. How did this island become this unique and geologically complex crescent shape? So, as a person who needs their questions answered, I investigated this topic, and the results were more than satisfying. From just a few limestone and metamorphic hills to massive caldera-forming eruptions, Santorini definitely had a more complex history than I … Continue reading How it’s Made: The Formation of Santorini

The Minoan Tsunami: Two Theories, Past and Present

When I was thirteen I visited the coastal Alaskan town of Yakutat for a photography trip with my dad. On the beach there were signs to look out for wash up items on the beach from the 2011 Japan tsunami, some of the items included dolls, soccer balls and a lot of trash. I was shocked to see these items on a beach in Alaska when the tsunami occurred over 4000 miles away. This was my first and only experience with a tsunami. Six years later I came here to Greece and learned about the tsunami from the Minoan eruption and my curiosity was piqued again. 

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Unpredictability of a Destructive Killer

I always find myself trailing behind the rest of the class, whether this be on hikes or walks to get gelato. I can’t help but be intrigued with everything I see… On the hike to the town of Oia, I gaze up and see the other ten of my classmates scribbling in their notebooks. Some students are frantically writing down everything my professor says, others are writing while carrying on side conversations about what they see. As for me, I step back and peer around the rim of the caldera. It wasn’t until this moment when I thought, “When will there be another volcanic eruption in Santorini?”

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To The Moon, Pyroclastic Flows & Beyond!

June 8th, 2016: Today, NAU in Greece visited the moon…in a Fiat van. With my head out the window and my hair not-so-elegantly-wind blown, we had arrived to Vlychada beach. Upon arrival, my ears were overwhelmed by the sound of the waves gently picking up stones and dropping them and my eyes didn’t know whether to take in the deep blue of the ocean, or the rigid outline of distant islands, or the massive moon-like rock wall to the left of me. All of this pleasant thinking was quickly interrupted by a hefty gust of wind that dusted my eyes with a uninvited layer of ash. At that moment, I directed my interest to the origin of my pain: the moonscape.

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