CALDERA PRESS: TSUNAMI SMACKS SANTORINI

March 14, 2021 It wasn’t even a wave – it was like a brick wall of water. You blinked one minute and it was already hitting the rocks.” Around 3:20 pm yesterday, a 6.2 magnitude earthquake occurred just southwest of Antikythera in the Aegean Sea. The impact of the quake sent a fast-moving wave of water ripping through the Mediterranean at speeds of upwards of … Continue reading CALDERA PRESS: TSUNAMI SMACKS SANTORINI

Surviving Shattered Glass

As a little girl, I was told horror stories by my grandma about our ancestors and the monstrous wave that hit our little island of Santorini Greece, devouring everything in its path. I listened, eyes wide with terror as she detailed how at first the people living on the island were in awe and thought they had been blessed because the retreating ocean had left … Continue reading Surviving Shattered Glass

A Greek Recipe for a Big Wave

τσουνάμι
Tsunami (Greek)

Hey there! My name is Sierra and I am currently studying the geologic hazards associated with Santorini, Greece. As a class we’ve hiked basement rock, sketched a cinder cone, and observed ash deposits – all clear remnants of volcanic activity. One hazard you may not be quick to think of is tsunami, but being an island, the risk is always there. Don’t worry though, I’ve included a quick recipe to reference from home:

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You Sea, I Sea, We All Sea Tsunamis

When first entering this course, I had no clue what to expect. When Lisa told me my hazard was Tsunami, I thought to myself “we are here to study volcanoes, why the heck do I have to know anything about tsunamis?” Little did I know that this class was a whole lot more than just volcanoes. Tsunamis form at tectonic plate boundaries; however, there affects … Continue reading You Sea, I Sea, We All Sea Tsunamis

The Minoan Tsunami: Two Theories, Past and Present

When I was thirteen I visited the coastal Alaskan town of Yakutat for a photography trip with my dad. On the beach there were signs to look out for wash up items on the beach from the 2011 Japan tsunami, some of the items included dolls, soccer balls and a lot of trash. I was shocked to see these items on a beach in Alaska when the tsunami occurred over 4000 miles away. This was my first and only experience with a tsunami. Six years later I came here to Greece and learned about the tsunami from the Minoan eruption and my curiosity was piqued again. 

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