Ignorance is Not Bliss: What Doomed Pompeii and Saved Akrotiri

Throughout our study here on Santorini, our geologic knowledge was built up to one main event: the Minoan eruption. As an anthropology major, all I was concerned about was the settlement of Akrotiri, which was preserved beneath the ash. As I wandered through the excavation site of Akrotiri, I began to draw comparisons between this city and the city of Pompeii.
The main point of difference between these two very similar cases is the death toll. Akrotiri excavations have turned up no human remains, or any sign of human activity during the eruption at all. This indicates that the Minoans evacuated before the eruption even began, most likely during the preliminary earthquakes. Conversely, Pompeii is closely linked in memory to the bodies found preserved in casts of ash. While all of Pompeii has not be excavated, the number of bodies found represents a tenth of the overall population, putting the death toll in the thousands.
I began to wonder: why did Akrotiri evacuate and not Pompeii? There are several possible factors that could have led to the Minoans abandoning their city before the real danger even began.

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Akrotiri: Abandoned and Preserved

Throughout human history, volcanoes have played a critical role in both the creation and the destruction of civilizations. While the fertile soil created by volcanic activity attracts the development of nearby settlements, an eruption has the power to annihilate a flourishing culture. In some cases, such as those of Italy’s Pompeii and Santorini’s Akrotiri, the eruption style pairs destruction with preservation resulting in a snapshot … Continue reading Akrotiri: Abandoned and Preserved